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GSC Honors Program Members Present at Georgia Collegiate Honors Council Conference

Posted on Monday, March 25, 2019

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Natalie Neil, Lenix Carter, David Janssen, Katie Janssen, Davis Callaway

Members of the Gordon State College Honors Program recently presented at the Georgia Collegiate Honors Council Conference.

Held this year at Valdosta State University, the Georgia Collegiate Honors Council is an organization formed for the promotion and advancement of honors education in institutions of higher learning in the state of Georgia.

The theme of this year’s conference was “Building Communities.” Undergraduate students were invited to submit proposals for academic and creative work relevant to the theme. 

 “Our students did a tremendous job of representing scholarship at Gordon State,” said David Janssen, Honors Program Coordinator, Professor of English.

 Gordon State students who presented papers included:

Davis Callaway, a junior English, and history major, “Making Beasts of Ourselves: The Consequences of Toxic Masculinity.”

 “This experience allowed me to see what it is like to present in my discipline on the level of professionals with degrees and credentials higher than my own,” he said. “I was able to step out into the world of conferences in a supporting and nurturing space.”

 Katie Janssen, a sophomore psychology major and Natalie Neill, a sophomore English major, “Sibling Abuse: How Parents Make Competition Dangerous.”

 “While attending this conference, I was able to gain experience in presenting my research and bringing attention to issues that I believe are important,” said Neill. “I was also given the opportunity to listen to a variety of other presentations from students who were bringing valuable and eye-opening information to the table.”

 Neil’s co-presenter, Janssen said that the conference helped her address her public speaking anxiety.

 “The environment at the conference was so supportive that I was able to relax and do my presentation with relative ease,” she said. “Everyone attending the conference was really enthusiastic and curious, and getting to talk to them helped me to think even deeper about my topic so that I can further improve my research in the future.”

Lenix Carter, a freshman computer science major, presented a paper titled, “Building for Chaos: Generating Randomness in Deterministic Systems.”